African Wild Dog

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Re: African Wild Dog

Post by Nordue » Fri Jan 11, 2013 12:18 am

  • That reminds me BlackWarrior ...what do you think of their hunting techniques? Specifically, disembowelment?

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Re: African Wild Dog

Post by BlackWarrior » Fri Jan 11, 2013 12:30 am

Tonbei wrote:
  • That reminds me BlackWarrior ...what do you think of their hunting techniques? Specifically, disembowelment?
Well I find it very intriguing to see when animals vocalize and coordinate themselves in a hunt in a way that is almost like 'strategy'. For these canines, they appear to take the animal on a long flee in order to tire out their prey before cornering it and going in. It seems quite effective and after a bit of reading up, proves to be more successful than other hunt strategies. ^^

You know, disembowelment seems to give African Wild Dogs a bad name, simply because it does appear as quite cruel from our point of view. But I imagine these dogs have evolved over generations and have found this technique specifically effective? As we saw in the video, the dogs seemed to be eating their prey alive. Not an expert on these sort of things, but disembowelment may have helped in terms of ending the suffering. -- even though it's pretty cruel.. ;)
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Re: African Wild Dog

Post by liam123hynes » Thu Mar 07, 2013 8:42 pm

I love African Wild Dogs! They're like my second favorite animal. Here is fact I now about these majestic animals:
When an African wild dog pack comes back from a hunt. They regergitate the food to not just the pups, but also the babysitter.

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Post by MimpiDreams » Wed Sep 02, 2015 11:36 am

Harmony wrote:I love Africa wild dogs, there one of my favorite animals.

Me too :P
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Re: Re:

Post by valkea » Wed Sep 02, 2015 11:39 am

mimpi1000game wrote:
Harmony wrote:I love Africa wild dogs, there one of my favorite animals.

Me too :P
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Re: African Wild Dog

Post by wolf567 » Tue Jan 26, 2016 11:50 am

Not sure if it has been posted in this topic already, but one of the reasons I really like African Painted/Wild Dogs is how their pups are the most important member of their packs.

Once the alpha female has given birth she will stay in the den for around the first three weeks. During this time the only other member of the pack to enter the den will be someone taking mum some food. After these three weeks it is important that mum gets back out and helps hunt as she is normally one of the most experienced member of the pack. The pups are not left on their own, as a baby sitter is always left to keep an eye on them. Once the pack returns the pups are the first to eat. This continues when the pups are bigger enough to join hunts, they are always the first to eat. This is until a year later when the next litter of pups is normally born.

They are one of the most successful hunters in Africa (if not the most successful), with around an 80-90% success rate on the hunts they go out on. Compared to only around 30% for lions!

Where I work we currently have 42 adult painted dogs and recently welcomed a litter to one of our packs. Still unsure how many are in the litter. Once I get some pictures I will post them.
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Re: African Wild Dog

Post by -FireBreaker- » Thu Jan 28, 2016 1:19 pm

I find African wild dogs interesting. I think they look cool and cute.
Just like Wolf567 said, i like how the pups are the most important members of the pack and how they are the one of the most successful hunters in Africa.
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Re: African Wild Dog

Post by valkea » Thu Jan 28, 2016 5:34 pm

wolf567 wrote:Not sure if it has been posted in this topic already, but one of the reasons I really like African Painted/Wild Dogs is how their pups are the most important member of their packs.

Once the alpha female has given birth she will stay in the den for around the first three weeks. During this time the only other member of the pack to enter the den will be someone taking mum some food. After these three weeks it is important that mum gets back out and helps hunt as she is normally one of the most experienced member of the pack. The pups are not left on their own, as a baby sitter is always left to keep an eye on them. Once the pack returns the pups are the first to eat. This continues when the pups are bigger enough to join hunts, they are always the first to eat. This is until a year later when the next litter of pups is normally born.

They are one of the most successful hunters in Africa (if not the most successful), with around an 80-90% success rate on the hunts they go out on. Compared to only around 30% for lions!

Where I work we currently have 42 adult painted dogs and recently welcomed a litter to one of our packs. Still unsure how many are in the litter. Once I get some pictures I will post them.
I admit to not really knowing anything about AWDs (my experience with them is essentially looking at pictures and thinking they're pretty), though all the information here is really interesting and makes me more interested in them. I wasn't expecting them to be such successful hunters, either, I thought their success rate would be more comparable to wolves, or lions at best. I should probably read through this thread more, heh.

It's really cool that you get to work with them, and I'd love to see pictures of the recent litter at some point!
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Re: African Wild Dog

Post by TheSeaWolf » Sat Mar 12, 2016 2:49 pm

I absolutely love AWD. They're beautiful, have such complex hunting strategies, and have pretty unique social structures. It's not often that you see an animal where the males are sort of the core of the pack. Males like to stick with their natal pack, and females are the ones to disperse. I think that the only other animals I've heard of with that kind of social structure are Resident killer whales. And even those guys are still led by a female, whereas males are the more dominant gender of AWD. So interesting.

I'll probably compile some information on AWD conservation as well, and post the link here when I'm done. They are endangered, after all. Habitat loss, some severe habitat/population fragmentation, and poaching are the causes. I'll try and get together some good conservation organizations that work on them.
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Re: African Wild Dog

Post by wolf567 » Tue Mar 15, 2016 10:19 am

The Endangered Wildlife Trust does some fantastic work with African Wild Dogs. They manage a meta population in South Africa.
The National Wild Dog Metapopulation project evolved out of a need to develop and expand the scope of the KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) Wild Dog Project. There are less than 450 free-ranging Wild Dogs left in South Africa and the managed metapopulation approach to Wild Dog conservation in South Africa has been adopted to complement the small free roaming population in the country’s Waterberg region and the unmanaged population in the Kruger National Park. The managed metapopulation comprises a series of geographically isolated private and state reserves that are capable of sustaining Wild Dogs, but which need continual, intensive, collaborative efforts to manage these subpopulations as one, collective metapopulation.

https://www.ewt.org.za/CCP/wilddogmeta.html

We had a talk at work from the field officer for their wild dog program. They have had brilliant success with this project, and numbers of wild dogs in the areas they work in are increasing!! It is a really fascinating project.
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Re: African Wild Dog

Post by Silver Mist Wolf » Fri Apr 22, 2016 3:37 pm

Nordue wrote:
  • Link:

    Enjoy and be educated,
    • Tonbei
Wow! This was both horrifying and morbidly beautiful. True savages and masters of hunting. The live disembowelment looks cruel to me, but I assume the prey goes into shock at some point and no longer suffers.

Aside from the way they hunt, their pelts and body structure are beautiful to me. I love the lanky legs and big ears.




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Re: African Wild Dog

Post by wolf567 » Tue May 30, 2017 12:29 pm

Thought I would share something that I recently found out at work. Our Head of Large Carnivores recently attended a canid meeting run by EAZA (European Association of Zoos and Aquariums) where they shared some results based on new research into African Painted Dogs.

It has been discovered that they are not as successful at hunting as first thought, their success rate is thought to only be approximately 40%. But it still remains that they are very cooperative when it comes to looking after pups. Once I see the research article published anywhere I will make sure I share it on here.
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Re: African Wild Dog

Post by Isela » Wed Jun 14, 2017 8:09 pm

African Wild Dogs are one of my most favorite canids. They're so fascinating, especially their familial/social structure, and how each member of the pack chips in to help raise the pups and care for the sick and the old <3

I actually wrote an article recently about the painted dogs. It's got a lot of the same facts that have been shared here in this topic, and compiled information I got from other sources, but if anyone is interested in reading it here's the link: https://www.theodysseyonline.com/specie ... n-wild-dog

wolf567 wrote:Thought I would share something that I recently found out at work. Our Head of Large Carnivores recently attended a canid meeting run by EAZA (European Association of Zoos and Aquariums) where they shared some results based on new research into African Painted Dogs.

It has been discovered that they are not as successful at hunting as first thought, their success rate is thought to only be approximately 40%. But it still remains that they are very cooperative when it comes to looking after pups. Once I see the research article published anywhere I will make sure I share it on here.
This is interesting. It was always said that they are one of the most successful hunters in the world, though it does beg the question on how dated that information actually is. I'm very intrigued about reading the article for it :]

The National Wild Dog Metapopulation project sounds amazing! It's definitely encouraging to know that they've been having great success with the project! Would like to see the population trend continue to rise!

Also wolf567, if you don't mind me asking and if it's not too off-topic, where is it that you work and are able to work around African wild dogs? Apologies if it was already mentioned and I didn't put two and two together haha
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Re: African Wild Dog

Post by Ecliptic » Wed Aug 23, 2017 7:39 am

I love how unique each one is; I doubt any two look exactly the same. Here are some facts I found interesting:

Often their tail is tipped with white, and their muzzle is brown. Their cheeks and higher are a golden-brown color, while a brown stripe runs up their nose to their forehead. They usually have brown behind the ears, or at least that's what a great majority have. But apart from that, everything is different, every color and every pattern. It's pretty amazing.

Wild dogs also only have four toes, unlike the dogs' five. They're probably missing a dewclaw.

In northeast Africa, wild dogs tend to have more black on their coat, with a few tiny patches of white or brown. Yet in the south, coat colors are much more diverse, with bigger patches covering their bodies.

Unlike wolves, they lack much of a hierarchy, so they rarely have skirmishes. And their pups are always put first, which I thought was adorable.

Wild dogs lose their fur with age, so a younger dog generally has more fur, and an older one, less.

Being the most successful hunter, it makes sense that their life span in the wild would often range to be up to ten years in the wild. They have around an 80 percent success rate, while a tiger's is thought to be around 30 or 30.

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Re: African Wild Dog

Post by Windstrider » Wed Aug 23, 2017 10:03 pm

^ Those are pretty interesting. I like what I've read so far about how they all raise the pups together and actually care for the sick or elderly ones. Respect your elders, lol.

Has anyone else seen "Solo: The Wild Dog's Tale?" Part of it was about how she lived with a pack of black-backed jackals and helped raise some jackal pups, it was pretty neat.

http://tvblogs.nationalgeographic.com/2 ... dogs-tale/

Part of the article describing how she cared for the pups, as well as how the relationship benefited both her and the jackal pack in several ways:
But it’s Solo’s relationship with the jackals that is most surprising. Over the last few years, Solo has helped the jackals raise their pups, frequently regurgitating food to them just as she would her own pups. At first the adult jackals were wary of this strange interloper and tried to chase Solo off by biting and attacking her. But once she started feeding the pups, the jackals accepted her. Now Solo often spends the day resting close together with the jackals and the pups have grown extremely close to her. Spending so much time with the jackals has its benefits for Solo’s favorite food, impala, do not seem to recognize the danger as long as she is among her jackal friends. Often the impala venture unwittingly close, making it easier for Solo to catch them.
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